What Does a Claim Researcher Do?

What Does a Claim Researcher Do?

Lauth Investigations International’s Lost Assets Division is a company focused on recovering your assets in a expeditious and professional manner. Our claims researchers are well trained and highly skilled to identify lost property and return it to it’s rightful owner. According to a CNN report form 2013, there’s more than $58 billion in unclaimed cash and benefits. The report says, “That’s roughly $186 for every U.S. resident. The unclaimed property comes from a variety of sources, including abandoned bank accounts and stock holdings, unclaimed life insurance payouts and forgotten pension benefits.” At Lauth Investigations International we strive to help families across the country. As a family run business we understand the hardships families face every day in America. Our goal is to make the process of recovering your assets as quick and easy as possible. Here’s just one of many testimonials from our satisfied clients: “Sincerely, thanks for everything. If you ever need a reference or a testimonial, let me know. Your perseverance really kept us going,” wrote Linda B. of Denver, CO. “My daughter is a single mom with a full time job and going to night school for her teacher’s certificate. I can’t tell you how much this meant to her to get this cushion money. We even took the kids to the circus last weekend on the “found” money…So, like I said, if you need a reference for someone who is skeptical (and there are so many scams out there), let me know. Thanks again, you did a terrific job.” Part of what sets Lauth Investigations International’s Lost Assets Division apart is the personal care we put into every case we handle. Claim researchers like Maria Moreland aren’t doing this job just to earn a paycheck. We are personally invested in helping families across the country. “I left a career after 25 years that i was good at, but was burned out and bored with my everyday tasks,” […]

States Governments and Unclaimed Property

A Brief Overview of How Assets and Property Become ‘Unclaimed’ Property becomes unclaimed when a financial institution or company loses contact with the owner of the assets for a period greater than one year, known as the dormancy period. Unclaimed property can be savings accounts, stocks, traveler’s checks, insurance payments, life insurance policies, or contents of safe deposit boxes to name a few. After a period of time specified by state law, holding companies have to turn over any unclaimed property to the state. The state will then attempt to locate the owner of the property and assets. The state can use these confiscated funds for government use while they attempt to locate the owner. When accounts or property are deemed abandoned, they are then converted into cash and taken by the state. In most states heirs can always reclaim their property, even after decades have gone by. However, States have different laws regarding unclaimed property. Many states do not pay interest or account for investment gains when they takes ownership of assets and, therefore, heirs lose out on those potential earnings. Unclaimed property and lost assets can range in value from a hundred dollars to half a million dollars. Currently, states in the United States hold an estimated $42 billion in unclaimed property; this is an increase from $32.8 billion in 2010.   Case 1: Delaware. In the fiscal year 2013, 16 percent of Delaware’s total general fund revenue came from unclaimed property, making it the state’s third largest revenue source. During a Supreme Court hearing on a California unclaimed property law, two justices stated that Delaware and several other states have not been working hard enough to inform citizens of their unclaimed property. The Council On State Taxation (COST) rated U.S. states on their unclaimed property laws. The COST report gave Delaware a score of D-, placing Delaware among the lowest ranked states. The score is based on […]

Claim Researchers are here to Help You, Not Scam You

Claim Researchers are here to Help You, Not Scam You

The word, scam, has such an ugly sound to it. In a world Wolf of Wall Street wannabe’s, telemarketers trying to sell you junk, and pyramid schemes that ruin the financial stability of so many. People are quick to misjudge companies that are taking different approaches to helping people and practicing good business habits. Many people and even government officials are on the watch for these scams. Which people should be aware of, and understand that the majority of interactions that start off by a generic email with no specifics of what actual money you may have are scams. With 33 billion dollars of unclaimed assets being held by the state treasury, and no official plan of returning all of it. The majority of the public is not aware that 1 in 10 Americans has unclaimed property. Worse, each state combined has only returned 5% of the unclaimed property to the rightful owners since 2006. Whether states are short-handed due to budget cuts, or simply not conducting strong enough public awareness campaigns, the fact is, the system is not working for those who could use the funds. How will this problem be solved? One simple answer, and that is Claim Researchers working for Lauth Investigations, Lost Assets Division. With an A+ Better Business Bureau Rating, rightfully returning assets to claimants is anything but a scam for Lauth Investigations. It’s helping return assets and property to the people who rightfully own them. This is a service position that helps claimants reunite with lost assets. Claim Researchers are contractors for Lauth Investigations, and are properly trained through live or virtual demonstration, description, and interpretation of the necessary steps in helping claimants receive their unclaimed assets. Claim Researchers will conduct genealogy, call/contact families, and heirs nationwide and assist individuals in utilizing the proper legal format to submit to the holding state, and help prepare required documents to register and defend their claim for […]

Choosing the Right Heir Finder

Choosing the Right Heir Finder

What is an Heir Finder? Heir finders do many different things such as locating legitimate lost assets as well as their potential owners or heirs, obtaining required documentation, assisting in the filing of the claim and much more. Heir finders can work for a number of different companies or independently. There are many different heir finders out there so it’s important to choose the one that best fits your needs. Things to Consider With multiple options and things to consider, you might find it difficult to decide which heir finder to choose. To find the heir finder that’s best for you, it’s important to determine what your needs are and what’s most important to you when considering an heir finder. Privacy and Security If you take your personal information seriously and your privacy is important to you, it might be a good idea to choose a licensed private investigation company or other incorporated business to assist you with your lost assets claim. These companies usually hold their employees to very high privacy and security standards. Policies and Codes of Conduct are usually in place to secure your information is secure at all times. Identity theft has been at an all-time high over the last several years so taking this into consideration should be one of your top priorities. Approving the Claim Lost assets can belong to the original owner, beneficiaries named in a will, heirs determined by the State intestate succession, an open or closed company, an open or closed trust, and more. The documentation required for each claim varies based on circumstance. There are many circumstances that can make it difficult to obtain the required documentation to prove the claim to the state. Since everything is determined on a case by case basis and everything is very much circumstantial, it’s important to choose an heir finder with the experience and knowledge necessary to get your claim approved. Licensed private investigation companies generally have the resources and knowledge required to obtain […]

Corporate Due Diligence and Asset Searches in Litigation

Corporate Due Diligence and Asset Searches in Litigation

Corporate Structure Unlike typical businesses or limited liability companies (LLC’s), corporations are structured differently and created under the laws of a state to establish it as a separate entity of its Board of Directors. Various forms of corporations exist and the actions of the corporate officers are governed by the bylaws of the entity. Though not universal throughout the United States, one aspect of a corporation is in the event that a corporation fails, shareholders, may lose their investments, members may lose their positions and employees may lose their jobs but will not be held liable for remaining debts owed to the corporation’s creditors. Corporations are generally accepted by law to have responsibilities similar to that of an individual and can exercise rights against other individuals and entities, and even be held responsible for violations and criminal offenses, such as fraud. Many corporations are created as entities of perpetual duration and can exist indefinitely until legally dissolved voluntarily by members or shareholders, statutorily, or by court order. Corporate Litigation Corporate litigation is a complex area of law that can include a variety of tort and contractual claims, such as breach of contract, fraud, infringement of intellectual property, and breach of fiduciary duties. Commercial insurance disputes can also be a source of litigation when an insurance claim is undervalued and denied as a fair claim requiring the claimant to sue to recover the amount they are entitled to. During any corporate or business dispute, it is advisable to attempt to resolve the dispute through negotiation or arbitration. However, if the dispute(s) cannot be resolved, litigation can be utilized to resolve the dispute(s). Corporate Disputes and Legal Considerations Employment Law Disputes Corporate Contract Negotiation Breach of Contract and General Contract Disputes Payment Disputes Non-Compete Agreements Property sell and purchasing Mergers and Acquisitions Commercial Leasing Disputes Insurance Disputes Employee Fraud/Embezzlement Corporate Partnership Disputes Business Torts Why Companies in Litigation Over 500K Should Conduct […]

Guidelines to Ensure You Are Working With a Licensed and Competent Private Investigator

Any time you hire an individual or company to provide a service whether it may be a simple home repair or as important as hiring someone to watch your children it is always a good idea to check the background of the business or individual you may be contemplating on hiring. This is also recommended as a good rule of thumb to also investigate the investigator when hiring a firm to assist you in any private investigation. Commonly private investigators assist companies, individuals and attorneys with services that can identify, locate, analyze and verify information about personal, financial or legal matters. From providing employment verification to investigating identity theft, harassment and infidelity, private investigators also perform surveillance and conduct interviews when assisting attorneys in case preparation of civil and criminal cases. Private investigators play an important role in ensuring facts are documented and presented in a legal manner acceptable by courts throughout the country. Taking into consideration Federal and State Laws privacy laws, working with a licensed private investigator or firm is the first step to make certain that information and the manner it is obtained is legal, accurate and admissible in court. Many times private investigators must make judgment calls and vital you are working with individuals of the highest integrity. Most private investigators have worked in the criminal justice field and some even former law enforcement. Despite credentials, it is important to verify the individual or firm you are working with is also licensed to carry out the work to be performed. Though not every state requires a private investigator to be licensed, doing some of your own footwork can ensure you are protected and even save you time and money. For states that do require private investigators to be licensed, most require the investigator to be over the age of eighteen, a combination of education or work experience in the field of criminal justice. They must also […]

Unclaimed Property is No Joke – How to Find the Right Help?

Unclaimed Property is No Joke – How to Find the Right Help?

What is Unclaimed Property? So you get a call from someone who tells you there is a half-million dollars that belongs to you and is being held in a state trust. Next , they asks you to sign a contract to pay a small fee to receive assistance recovering the unclaimed property. Sound like a scam? Recently, the Washington Post reported over $32 billion in unclaimed money in the United States. According to the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, every state including District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have unclaimed property. programs usually administered by the state treasury to actively attempt to find rightful owners of assets that have been lost or simply forgotten. Unclaimed money can end up in a state trust simply by an individual moving, not having their mail forwarded, having a death in the family, assets not documented in a will, misplaced documents or a safe deposit box that may have belonged to an individual and other family members who were not aware of it. The unclaimed funds do not become property of the state and remain in trust until a rightful owner or a legal heir claims the money. It is estimated 1 in 10 people have unclaimed money held in state trusts. Source: Washington Post, National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, Missouri State Treasurer As one of the original consumer protection programs, unclaimed property laws have existed since the 1940s. State laws require financial institutions, insurance companies, public agencies and businesses to report and turn over assets that belong to a customer, client or employee. If there is documented proof that no transactions have occurred or there has been lack of contact with the owner for five or more years. The property typically consists of cash in bank accounts, securities, bonds, escrow accounts, contents of safe deposit boxes, pensions, uncollected insurance policies, government and state refunds, utility deposits and […]